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Social Studies

The Social Studies Department encourages students to become citizens who know Christ as their Savior and desire to live like Him. This is accomplished by discovering biblical principles within history, government, and economics; by developing and using critical thinking skills; and by effectively communicating through the written and spoken word, thus becoming agents of renewal in the world.

Social Studies Department Courses

World History
In the 10th grade World History class, students survey the history of man from a biblical perspective, gaining an understanding of how God has worked and is working in our world.  Topics that are studied include the growth of world civilizations, medieval Europe, developments in Asia and Africa, the Renaissance and Reformation, the formation and growth of nations and empires, industrialism, imperialism, the world wars, the postwar world, and the opening of the 21st Century.

Prerequisites:  None.

Full year—1 credit

AP World History
In the 10th grade Advanced Placement World History class, students study world history from approximately 8000 B.C. to the present. Students investigate the for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods by analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, and engaging in chronological reasoning. Students learn a substantial amount of social, political, and economic history as well as how to analyze and evaluate that information in class discussions and essays.

AP World History differs in several ways from other courses students may have taken in the past:

  • A significantly larger body of information is covered in this course.
  • Students are responsible for reading and comprehending college-level textbook material and primary documents.
  • Many assignments must be completed outside of class.
  • Assessments and assignments require students to understand, analyze, and evaluate information in greater quantities and at deeper levels than is typical in regular courses.
  • The pace of the course is fairly rapid.

This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of full year introductory college courses.  It is possible to earn college credit for AP World History through successful completion of the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites:  None.

Full year—1 credit

United States History

In the 11th grade United States History class, students survey the history of our nation from a biblical perspective, discovering how God’s hand has guided in its formation and development. The scope of this course consists of the history of the United States from pre-exploration to the present.  Topics that are studied include European exploration, colonization, the Revolution, the Constitution, the growth of the young United States, westward expansion, the Civil War, industrialization, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Age of Information, and the opening of the 21st Century.  Arizona history is highlighted when aspects of our state’s history appear in the story of America’s development. 

Prerequisites:  None.  

Full year—1 credit

AP United States History
In the 11th grade AP/DE United States History class (APUSH), students survey the history of our nation from a biblical perspective, discovering how God’s hand has guided in its formation and development.  The scope of this course consists of the history of the United States from pre-exploration to the present.  The course is designed to develop students’ higher level thinking, speaking, and writing skills while acquiring a thorough knowledge of U.S. History.  Students learn a substantial amount of social, political, and economic history as well as how to analyze and evaluate that information in class discussions and essays.

APUSH differs in several ways from other courses students may have taken in the past:

  • A significantly larger body of information is covered in this course.
  • Students are responsible for reading and comprehending college-level textbook material and primary documents.
  • Many assignments must be completed outside of class.
  • Assessments and assignments require students to understand, analyze, and evaluate information in greater quantities and at deeper levels than is typical in regular courses.
  • The pace of the course is fairly rapid.

This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of full year introductory college courses.  It is possible to earn college credit for APUSH through a dual enrollment program or through successful completion of the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites:  Students are placed in APUSH by recommendation from the previous year’s World History teacher.

Full year—1 credit

Economics
In the 12th grade Economics class, students are introduced to classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits.  This one-semester course seeks to provide a unified framework to address these issues from a distinctly Christian perspective and to study the impact of different economic policies on the aggregate behavior of individuals.  Analytical tools will be used to understand recent economic experiences of the United States and other countries, and to address how current policy initiatives affect macroeconomic performance.

Prerequisites:  None.

One semester—.5 credit

United States Government
In the 12th grade United States Government class, students study the political system of the United States with an emphasis on the constitutional development of the three branches.  Students also explore voting, political parties, campaigns and elections, interest groups, public opinion, and current domestic policy controversies.  The course is designed to increase the student’s awareness and understanding of the political process, as well as the impact of race, gender, and ethnicity upon this process.  In addition, the citizen’s role within that process is discussed in light of a Christian worldview.

Prerequisites:  None.

One semester—.5 credit

AP United States Government
AP/DE Government offers 12th grade students the opportunity to study the American political system and its origins in depth.  Students study the political system of the United States with an emphasis on the constitutional development of the three branches.  Students also explore voting, political parties, campaigns and elections, interest groups, public opinion, and current domestic policy controversies.  The course is designed to increase the student’s awareness and understanding of the political process, as well as the impact of race, gender, and ethnicity upon this process.  In addition, the citizen’s role within that process is discussed in light of a Christian worldview.  This course is reading and writing intensive.  Students should expect an average of 2 hours of work outside of class per school day.

AP/DE Government differs from other courses in the following ways:

  • A significantly larger body of information is covered in this course.
  • Students are responsible for reading and comprehending college-level textbook material and primary documents.
  • Many assignments must be completed outside of class.
  • Assessments and assignments require students to understand, analyze, and evaluate information in greater quantities and at deeper levels than is typical in regular courses.
  • The pace of the course is fairly rapid.

This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of full year introductory college courses.  It is possible to earn college credit for AP/DE Government through a dual enrollment program or through successful completion of the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites:  Students are placed in AP/DE Government by recommendation from the previous year’s United States History teacher.

One semester—.5 credit